Stone Garden

  In 1963, the “Land Reforms” enacted by Iran’s Shah regime redefined ancient property lines in a wave of militant social restructuring. Furious, a farmer named Darvish Khan Esfandiyarpour sought to retain his land but born mute and hard-of-hearing he needed to protest in a non-verbal manner. He stopped watering and taking care of his soil, creating a garden of dead trees, which he adorned, using thick wires, chains, and ropes, with stone fruit of various sizes. This Stone Garden, as he termed it, became completely undesirable to the Shah and the farmer’s land was never seized by the regime.

    By collecting pieces of dead trees and stones and recreating this stone garden as an exploration of the power of creative resistance, I seek to argue against the atrocities and the policies carried out by the agencies and centers of power and money.

 

Stone Garden, Installation View, 2020.

 

Stone Garden, Installation View, 2020.

 

Stone Garden, Installation View, 2020.

 

Stone Garden, Installation Detail, 2020.

 

Stone Garden, Installation Detail, 2020.